Archive for 'Startups'


Orlando tech co-working space Canvs to open next month

Posted on 15. Jul, 2014 by in Colearn, Coworking, Coworking Day, coworkingweek, Startups

Canvs, the nonprofit co-working space in downtown Orlando, will open next month, co-founder Philip Holt said in an interview with Orlando Business Journal . Holt, also the CEO of Orlando-based analytics company Splyt, said the co-working space inside of the Church Street Exchange building will open Aug. 11. 

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Beta Collective Opens First Coworking Space in Surrey

Posted on 15. Jul, 2014 by in Colearn, Coworking, Coworking Day, coworkingweek, Startups

SURREY — In a time where full pension, salaried nine-to-five jobs are a rarity, more and more people are turning to self-employment for their income.

The problem is, when you work from home, there are a plethora of distractions pulling you away from your work — like screaming children and unwashed laundry — and leasing a commercial office space can be pricey.

Enter Beta Collective, Surrey’s very first co-working space. Jason Wong, with business partners Elvin Cheung and Michael Cheng of online enterprise Witty Cookie, have launched a unique shared office facility in Surrey’s Innovation Boulevard, a cutting-edge business hub set to forge new ground in the areas of health care and technology.

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Hawaii’s first co-working space for social innovators

Posted on 15. Jul, 2014 by in Coworking, Coworking Day, coworkingweek, Startups

locally connected, globally embedded. That’s what Hawaii’s first co-working space hopes to achieve. It’s called Impact Hub and it’s made up of a community of people, organizations, and businesses. Impact Hubs collaborate with the regional arts scene and also serve as a gallery where local art will be displayed and sold.

It will open in Our Kaka’ako in September and will connect the local enterprising community to a global network of more than 50 Impact Hubs on six continents through HUBNet, an online idea-sharing platform.

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Internships at startups: an alternative to MBAs

Posted on 05. Feb, 2014 by in blog, Classes, Colearn, Coworking, Funding, San Francisco, SOMA, startup camp, Startups

Don’t waste your money doing an MBA.
Get an internship instead.

Wanna be an entrepreneur? It takes more than just passion and desire. You need real skills to succeed, but where do you get them? A surprising number of people think that they should do an MBA. I don’t blame them. After all, universities invest a significant amount of effort convincing potential students that getting an MBA is a good idea. The cruel reality, though, is that MBA programs tend to be terrible at teaching entrepreneurship and, in particular, tech entrepreneurship. They are slow, expensive, include too much theory and not enough practice, and, more importantly, they are taught by people that have not been entrepreneurs themselves. Fortunately, there is a better alternative: Internships at tech startups. Here is why:

MBAs are about enterprise-level management while internships can be about entrepreneurship. The skills required to manage and be part of a 5,000 person company are different than the skills required to start and grow a company. In fact, enterprise-level management techniques may negatively affect the chances of success of your future startups. For example, using balance scorecards[1] and KPIs may be great for companies in advanced stages of growth, but they are an overkill for startups at the MVP stage.

Internships provide more hands-on knowledge than MBAs. While an MBA program will teach you a lot of theory, an internship will allow you to learn [a fraction of] that theory put to practice, plus many more techniques that are not taught in MBAs.

Internships are faster than MBAs. An MBA program lasts between one and two years. In contrast, you can do two or four internships in just one year. Don’t have a year? No problem. If you’re a fast learner, interning for six months may be enough.

Internships are less expensive than MBAs. Top MBA programs cost more than $100,000[2], not including living expenses. Internships cost 0. In fact, if you’re lucky, you may get a paid internship. This means that instead of you paying to learn, you’ll get paid to learn!

Assuming you want to do an internship already, these are some factors to keep in mind:

Intern at a startup with a team of less than 50 people. In a team of less than 50 you’re likely to interact with the founders and managers making important decisions. You’ll learn a lot from them. Also, you’re likely to get exposure to many different areas of the business. In larger teams, you are likely to interact with low-level managers that joined the company later in the game and are not likely to be too entrepreneurial. Also, you may have to focus in just one area of the business, missing out on the big picture.

Intern at a startup that is making money and growing. When revenue and growth are achieved, you have a company with a real business model. You want to learn how they got there. Don’t join a startup without a business model, a startup that is not making money, or a startup that is not growing, even if they have raised capital. Such companies may only teach you how to raise capital to subsidize the operation of a company, which is not sustainable. In fact, I recommend giving higher priority to bootstrapped companies.

Intern at a startup that is located in a tech innovation hub. You’ll be able to attend plenty of networking events and meetups. The people you’ll meet may change your life. I’ve met most of my co-founders at networking events. If in the US, I suggest startups in the Bay Area, New York City, and Boston. After all, it’s not only what you know, but who you know.

Visas are not necessarily an issue. Depending on your nationality and the country of the startup, it may be technically illegal for you to work there. Fortunately, some startups won’t care. Give the company the option to get paid in your country of origin as if you were an overseas contractor.

If possible, join a startup founded by a serial entrepreneur. Serial entrepreneurs, specially successful ones, have “been there and done that” several times. They are the equivalent of teachers with PhDs. These companies are more likely to follow successful, structured techniques that you will find useful in your future endeavors.

Target startups that don’t offer internships. Although some startups proactively look for interns, some don’t have the time do so. Find startups that you like and cold-email their founders. Messages like “Hey Joe. I’m willing to work for you for free just to learn from your wisdom” are very likely to grab the attention of the recipient. Even if only 10% of them reply, that’s still a good conversion rate!

A final word: Getting an MBA is a good way of telling others that you like to follow the crowd.
Tech entrepreneurship is about innovation. Innovation means disruption. Innovation is doing things that others don’t dare to do.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balanced_scorecard
[2] http://poetsandquants.com/2011/01/08/how-much-does-a-top-mba-degree-cost/

 

tumblr_la71ah37Tg1qbnnljo1_500Alex Torrenegra-

Founder and CEO of Bunny Inc. (VoiceBunny, Voice123, BunnyCast) and Torrenegra Labs. Techie, activist, investor, offroader.

 

2014 Citizen Space Residency Program

Posted on 28. Jan, 2014 by in Colearn, Coworking, Designers, Developers, Funding, Internships, Residency, San Francisco, SOMA, Startups

Last year we established a residency program to encourage the worlds DOER’S to succeed with their projects they would like to launch from our bay area location.

Membership4A total of 5 DOER’s or “startups” will receive free full-time resident access to a Citizen Space for three months valued at $425 per month. The Citizen-in-Residence can take advantage of both the physical spaces & the communal resources.

In exchange, they work on a project of their choosing that help the “COWORKING” community at large, documenting their progress through our social presences on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.  At the end of the residency, Citizens-in-Residence do a presentation to members of the space about their project.

Accepted Applicants will be announced one week prior to the residency start date. The first residency will start March 3, 2014 and the application process begins Tuesday, January 28, 2014.

We are seeking support from your company to help us make this program a success. If your company or you personally would like to sponsor this program, please email us: manager@citizenspace.us

 

APPLY NOW

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